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Henry R. Richmond

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Lifetime Achievement Award

The Lifetime Achievement Award honors individuals who have shown a dedication to extraordinary civic service with a commitment to improving livability for all.

Henry R. Richmond is being honored for his leadership as the cofounder of 1,000 Friends of Oregon. Richmond cofounded the organization in 1975, and his leadership and example incited the growth of 1,000 Friends across state-lines, creating a national network of 1,000 Friends organizations advocating for sustainable communities, the protection of farmland and forests, and the conservation of natural resources.

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As a 32 year-old attorney, Henry R. Richmond founded 1,000 Friends of Oregon in 1975 with noted environmentalist and then-Governor Tom McCall to protect the state’s new land-use law and advocate for sustainable communities. With the grassroots financial support of 1,000 Oregon residents pledging $100 per year, 1,000 Friends won dozens of court rulings protecting the law and built a diverse coalition of homebuilders, farmers, timber companies, and high tech companies.

Richmond’s incredible foresight in creating this unique organization to protect Oregon’s progressive land-use laws was key to shifting the dialogue and ensuring the protection of the state’s natural beauty, productivity, and overall livability. The broad coalition he helped build was essential for continued legislative support and implementation in 36 counties and 241 cities. Forty years later, the law remains a success — each city has an urban growth boundary (UGB) and 25 million acres of farm and forest land are protected outside of UGBs.

Richmond has created one of the most effective leadership devices for land-use management in the country today. He is seen as a founder of “smart growth” policies across the country, improving the quality of life for countless communities throughout the nation.

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10 Critical Challenges for Cities in 2014

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NLC report cover image
On Thursday, the National League of Cities released The 10 Critical Imperatives Facing Cities in 2014, its annual report highlighting ten of the most pressing issues facing cities across the United States. Partners board member and incoming NLC President, Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker explained during the report's unveiling, "This is not a wish list just of cities. This is a wish list of the people who live in America. That’s 80 percent of the population of America that’s being represented through us."

The ten items on the list were:

  1. Fragile Fiscal Health
  2. Deteriorating Transportation Infrastructure
  3. The Shrinking Middle Class
  4. Inadequate Access to Higher Education
  5. The Need for Affordable Housing
  6. A Less-Than-Welcoming Return for Veterans
  7. Gang Violence
  8. A Broken Immigration System
  9. Climate Change and Extreme Weather
  10. Lack of Public Trust

Click here to read the full report from NLC, which includes an overview of initiatives being taken by cities in their own efforts to tackle these ten challenges and create more livable communities for their residents.

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Chicago Botanic Garden

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For residents of Chicago’s northern suburbs, the Chicago Botanic Garden is much more than just a collection of colorful plants and flowers. Since it opened more than 40 years ago, the 385 acre grounds have served as an important center for community activity and education. The Garden is home to 26 separate gardens and four natural areas, as well as a conservation science education center and a library with one of the country’s largest collections of botanical books. The grounds are also host to numerous community events and educational courses throughout the year.

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How Key West is Dealing with Climate Change

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As climate change remains contentious topic in American politics on the federal level, more and more cities are taking it upon themselves to find solutions that will address this growing problem. Key West, Florida, is a popular tourist destination and also one of the most vulnerable places in the United States to rising sea levels. Like many places in South Florida, Key West is very flat, with many neighborhoods, including the downtown hub of tourist activity, reaching no higher than 3 ft. above sea level. 

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The Lafayette Greens

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The Lafayette Greens

In 1923, when the Lafayette Building was constructed in downtown Detroit, the city was one of the cultural centers of the United States and home to an exploding automotive industry. Famous American architect C. Howard Crane designed the cutting edge, Italian Renaissance-style building in a unique ‘V’ shape to maximize the amount of natural light allowed in. Today, however, Detroit has fallen on harder economic times, and the once striking skyscraper at 144 West Lafayette was torn down in 2010 after being vacant for more than a decade.
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Arlington Energy Masters

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arlingtonenergymastersThe Arlington Energy Masters program is a joint venture between three Washington, DC area nonprofit groups - Arlingtonians for a Clean Environment (ACE), Arlington Thrive, and the Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) – which aims to increase energy efficiency in Arlington’s low-income residences. Volunteers from the DC suburb are put through a 20 hour training course on what impacts a home’s water and energy usage and strategies to make homes more efficient. Once the training is completed, volunteers spend at least 60 hours in the community applying their knowledge to help lower energy and water usage in low-income apartments from throughout the county.

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Thomas E. Lovejoy

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Founders Award for Civic Leadership

The Founders Award for Civic Leadership acknowledges groups and individuals of national stature for his or her contributions to the stewardship of communities.

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Thomas E. Lovejoy is being honored for bringing climate change and the vulnerability of the world’s tropical rainforests to national attention. Lovejoy, an accomplished conservation biologist, is often credited with coining the term “biological diversity.”

Thomas E. Lovejoy traveled to Brazil in 1965 as a graduate student to conduct one of the first studies of the effects of habitat fragmentation in the Amazon. This led to what is now the largest long-term experiment in the history of landscape ecology, the Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments Project, which has produced invaluable data on the severe risks posed by habitat destruction and climate change.

In 1973, Lovejoy was named the director of the conservation program of the World Wildlife Fund. He served until 1987 at which time he became the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Affairs for the Smithsonian Institute and a protégé of Dillon Ripley. Lovejoy has lent his expertise as an environmental advisor to a number of influential organizations including the Inter-American Development Bank.

Lovejoy has played a fundamental role in bringing the vulnerability of the Amazon rainforest and the dangers of climate change to international attention, most notably through his work with David Attenborough on the PBS series Nature. For years he was the lone voice measuring the impact of climate change and habitat destruction on biodiversity. Today, Lovejoy is celebrated for his pioneering work in this emerging field and his noble devotion to the protection of the world’s most vulnerable natural habitats.

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Oak Hammock at the University of Florida, Inc.

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oakhammock_photocredit_oakhammockphoto credit Oak HammockAs the baby boomers reach retirement age, institutions across the United States will have to find creative solutions to accommodate their burgeoning numbers. Despite this growing need, a retirement community on a college campus might not seem to be a great idea. It’s not difficult to imagine late-night police calls from seniors who think midnight is entirely too late to be playing loud music, or are appalled by the undergraduates who trample the beloved garden of a 90-year old during their late night escapades. But Oak Hammock at the University of Florida, Inc. has created just such an unlikely pairing, a relationship in which university administration, students, senior residents, and other stakeholders have found a lot to like.  

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Intergenerational “Sense of Wonder” Contest

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Rarely does the subject of water inspire poetic phrases or passionate dedications. While we may occasionally recognize its importance, this appreciation is usually offset by the size of the water bill at the end of the month. Regardless, I’m going to ask an odd question: have you ever celebrated water? If I got a single “yes” I would be very surprised, for the simple reason that there are few formalized occasions for the public to appreciate water. This year, a multitude of civic and non-profit organizations have teamed up to give individuals the opportunity to celebrate their “love for water” in the annual Rachel Carson Sense of Wonder Contest.

Sense of Wonder Logo2012 marks the 40th Anniversary of the Clean Water Act. Although it was originally enacted in 1948, the Act was significantly reorganized and expanded in 1972 to regulate discharges of water pollutants and monitoring water quality standards in the United States. The Annual Rachel Carson Sense of Wonder Contest is honoring this anniversary and renaming itself the “Sense of Water Contest” for 2012.

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Jim Rogers

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Bridge Builders Award
 

Jim Rogers  is honored for his commitment to the environment and renewable energy programs in wind, solar, and policy development. As Chairman, Chief Executive Officer, and President of Duke Energy and with 22 years of experience in the electrical utility industry, Rogers is a leading figure of corporate responsibility for sustainable growth.
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Bridge Builder Recipient Peter Stein and Conservation Efforts

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Peter Stein, 2010 recipient of Partners’ Bridge Builders Award, sat down recently with Hanover’s local newspaper to talk about his work at the Lyme Timber Company.The article explores Stein’s use of public-private partnerships in conservation efforts and his take on how preserving nature can be good for investors' bottom line.

You can read more of the article at the Valley News.

Also, check out our Bridge Builder award for Peter Stein.

 

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Board Member Bill Reilly Completes Work With Oil Spill Commission

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Partners’ board member William “Bill” Reilly, former Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, has recently concluded work with the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling, which he co-chaired along with former Senator Bob Graham. Preliminary reports issued by the Commission this month criticized BP and its subcontractors for insufficiently prioritizing safety in their management cultures and in their operations. The Commission’s final report is scheduled to be released on January 11.
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“Green” Partners Continue to Inspire

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To remain economically competitive, our cities need to go “green.” Partners’ report “The Dollars and Sense of Green Businesss,” features 22 organizations across the country that are boosting the economic health of their cities by fostering green business initiatives. Six months after the release of Partners’ report, these organizations are still hard at work. Read on for key updates, and get inspired to make your community more prosperous through sustainability. Read the individual city profiles here.
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Miami Jumpstart Grantees

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Eight organizations and partnerships in Miami-Dade and Monroe Counties were each awarded a "JumpStart the Conversation" grant on February 2, 2009.

The winning projects exemplify the use of innovative ideas focused on creating livable communities for all ages and theme of "transportation and mobility options".  These strategies are aimed at the over 11 percent of residents age 65 and over in the two counties, and will encourage services that strengthen "aging in place" and increases accessibility to transportation and fosters independence among older adults.

The Grantees followed the Miami-Dade and Monroe Counties workshop on November 17, 2008; titled Increasing Transportation and Mobility Options: Creating Livable Miami-Dade & Monroe Counties for All Ages

Greater Miami Region Jumpstart Grants 

  • The North County Citizens Association 
    To discuss a pickup service, with the purpose of allowing older citizens unable to drive or access transportation to conduct necessary tasks such as doctor’s appointments and trips to the grocery store.  The NCCA is a voluntary organization dedicated to improving the community.  Many of its members are senior citizens, and this program would be an avenue for the community to give back to them.
  • Miami Lakes Town Foundation in partnership with The Alliance for Aging, Inc. 
    To hold a series of community meetings to evaluate the transportation needs of older adults in the Miami Lakes area.  The forums will be held once a month over a four month period and will encourage dialogue surrounding the issues of town public transportation, Miami-Dade county Public Transportation, as well as existing and planned trail systems.  The goal is to develop a strategy that will best coordinate accessibility to existing and planned programs, services and facilities to the aging population.
  • The City of Coral Gables in partnership with The Alliance for Aging, Inc.  
    To implement a pilot program of subsidized taxicab fares for people ages 65 and over.  Seniors would be able to purchase coupons at Coral Gables City Hall and the Coral Gables Youth Center.  These facilities are both accessible and well known to residents of the city.  It is the hope that this program will demonstrate an efficient way for seniors to use existing transportation systems while still having the flexibility and independence associated with driving one’s own vehicle
  • The Miami Behavioral Health Center (MBHC) 
    To promote a “Mobility Maps” program to seniors in the Miami-Dade area.  “Mobility Maps” will alert seniors to different transportation options based on their own specific transportation needs.  Each individual mobility map will provide descriptions of possible destinations as well as different methods of getting to each locale.  In addition to providing group sessions to create these maps, which can also serve to create social networks and improve psychosocial functioning, the MBHC will provide training to aging agencies and health service providers to maximize the number of seniors benefitting from this program.
  • The William Lehman Injury Research Center
    To improve a multi-faceted safe crossings program in response to Miami being ranked the third highest county in regards to pedestrian injuries.  The research center plans on using education, promotional and cultural materials to address the issue specifically in regards to the over 65 population.  Current materials will also be translated in Spanish and Creole in order to increase the scope of the project across language barriers.
  • The County of Monroe in partnership with The Alliance for Aging, Inc.  
    To investigate a solution to inefficient transportation (especially for older adults and pedestrians) between Monroe County and the Florida Keys.  Three planning sessions will be held to brainstorm ideas, including ways to make transportation more “green” and cost effective.
  • The Miami Lighthouse for the Blind in partnership with The Alliance for Aging, Inc.  
    To explore and implement a community based independent transportation network (ITN) in Miami-Dade County.  Using a combination of both paid and volunteer drivers, the ITN will be available 24-hours a day to transport seniors to local destinations.  After a series of meetings, a pilot community will be chosen to serve as an example of increase senior mobility that can be implemented citywide.
  • The Alliance for Aging, Inc. 
    To engage local and national experts on issues of senior transportation access in Miami-Dade, and to incorporate these issues into the county’s master transportation plan.  Three meetings will be hosted over a 6-month period and will focus on pedestrian needs and planning, and roadway improvement.  The meetings will serve as a follow-up to the Aging in Place workshop in November, with the goal of engaging traffic engineers and key stakeholders in issues related to aging and the public infrastructure, highlighting best practices in community transportation, and encouraging dialogue that will lead to positive changes.
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GreenAid Wants You to Bomb Your City

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Two Los Angeles designers want you to bomb the forgotten spaces of your city. The duo repurposes gumball machines into street-side “seed bomb” dispensers, now popping up in cities across the country. The “bombs” are a mixture of clay, compost and seeds that users throw anonymously into parking medians or sidewalk cracks, temporarily infusing a bit of green into an otherwise gray urban site. Read more about the “GreenAid” seed bomb project here.

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Charles O. Holliday

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Bridge Builders Award

For his devotion to and success in framing sustainable growth as a business imperative throughout his tenure at DuPont

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Peter Stein

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Bridge Builders Award

For his commitment to ensuring livable communities for generations to come through the conservation and sustainable use of forestland

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Sustainable Cities Initiative, University of Oregon

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Bridge Builders Award

For the Initiative’s innovative approach to creating sustainable cities through the cross-disciplinary engagement of scholars, community leaders, and project partners.

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Peter Calthorpe

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Investors in America Award

For his influential work in developing new approaches to urban redevelopment, suburban growth and regional planning.

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New Grant Series: The “Feds” Actually Listening to Cities, Regions

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Columnist Neal Pierce reports on the success of the Partnership for Sustainable Communities, the new federal collaboration of DOT, EPA, and HUD that has awarded a series of grants to communities "for roads and housing and environmental protection."
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